Bicycle City Alabama

Table of Contents
Potential Bicycle City Locations Introduction
Potential Alabama Bicycle City Locations
Alternative Energy Organizations & Companies in Alabama
Alabama Animal & Wildlife Groups
Alabama Business Organizations & Resources
Alabama Education Organizations & Resources
Alabama Environmental Organizations
Alabama State Government
Alabama International Groups
Conclusion
Introduction

Located in the deep south, the "Heart of Dixie" is an ideal location for a potential Bicycle City, Alabama, development due to its hunger for healthy and progressive living as well as its scenic topography.

Alabama offers a unique layout of a mountainous north and deeply cut valleys courtesy of the Tennessee River. Boasting a subtropical climate, Alabama's mild winters make it a great place for year round outdoor activities. Alabama's Bicycle City could provide outdoor enthusiasts with a numerous local opportunities to explore a challenging variety of trails and scenic views.

Known for generous investments into the fields of education and health care, Alabama is seeking out greener, more eco-friendly commutes and travel options that offer either rail or ferry transportation in each county.

The state is working to create a favorable business climate in order to compete globally, fitting into the professional environment planned for the potential Bicycle City, Ala., development. It was recently cited as a “Top Ten Pro-Business State” by the Pollina Report’s annual comparative list of job creation and retention efforts in all 50 states. Alabama was also ranked the fourth fastest-growing exporter in the U.S. last year. Overall, the state maintains a low tax structure and the development office reports favorable business incentives, ideal for possible Bicycle City business venture planning.

From golfing to camping, Bicycle City, AL, would be a place filled with residents and visitors who cherish the great outdoors. The Alabama State Parks system includes more than 20 parks throughout the state located along rivers or lakes and in the mountains.

Potential Alabama Bicycle City Locations

There are a number of established cities that would be ideal for Bicycle City, AL:

Anniston, AL
  • Population: 24,276
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 51.9 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 53; Feb. – 52; Mar. – 53; Apr. – 57; May – 71; Jun. – 78; Jul. – 80; Aug. – 78; Sep. – 71; Oct. – 63; Nov. – 54; Dec. – 48
  • Water (within 30 miles of Anniston): Black River Canyon, Little River Canyon, Line Creek, Salt Creek, Choccolocco Creek, Yellow Creek, Sky Valley
  • Adjacent Public Land: Anniston is a short drive from Bald Rock Boardwalk, Woodland Park, Cheaha State Park and Lake Guntersville State Park.
  • Zip Codes: 36201; 36202; 36203; 36204; 36205; 36206; 36207
  • Other Highlights: Anniston was awarded the All American City award in 1978, is surrounded by natural land preserves with trails, is environmentally friendly and has a strong child nutrition program in each school.
Cullman, AL
  • Population: 77,483
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 59.9 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 57; Feb. – 62; Mar. – 70; Apr. – 77, May – 84; Jun. – 91; Jul. – 93; Aug. – 92; Sep. – 88; Oct. – 79; Nov. – 69; Dec. – 49
  • Water: Smith Lake, Sportsman Lake
  • Adjacent Public Land: Clarkson Bridge Park, Hurricane Creek Park, Heritage Park
  • Zip Codes: 35053; 35055; 35057; 35058; 35059
  • Other Highlights: Cullman is home to the famous Ave Maria Grotto, Cullman County Museum and Weiss Cottage and is a sister city to Frankweiler, Germany, due to Cullman's large European Population.
Huntsville, AL
  • Population: 159,880
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 57.5 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 48; Feb. – 53; Mar. – 62; Apr. – 72; May – 79; Jun. – 86; Jul. – 89; Aug. – 88; Sep. – 82; Oct. – 73; Nov. – 62; Dec. – 52
  • Water: Madison County Lake, Noccalula Falls
  • Adjacent Public Land: Monte Sano State Park, Huntsville Land Trust, Wade Mountain, Wheeler Wildlife Refuge
  • Zip Codes: 35801; 35824; 35893
  • Other Highlights: Home to several Fortune 500 companies while still remaining eco-friendly; heavy focus on space research; unique opportunities presented each year to raise cultural awareness.
Mobile, AL
  • Population: 191,544
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 63.9 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 61; Feb. – 65; Mar. – 71; Apr. – 77; May – 84; Jun. – 89; Jul. – 91; Aug. – 91; Sep. – 87; Oct. – 79; Nov. – 70; Dec. – 63
  • Water: Mobile Bay, Timber Creek, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Coosa River
  • Adjacent Public Land: short distance from Doyle Park, Chickasawbogue Park
  • Zip Codes: 36601, 36612, 36614, 36619, 36621, 36623, 36625, 36626, 36628, 36631, 36633, 36640, 36641, 36644, 36652, 36660, 36663, 36670, 36671, 36675, 36685, 36688, 36689, 36690, 36691, 36693, 36695
  • Other Highlights: Mobile was the winner of the Alabama Quality Award & All America City Award. The city offers scenic trails, prides itself in retaining a feeling of community despite rapid growth and is consistently rated by Money Magazine as one of the top five most polite cities in the country.
Montgomery, AL
  • Population: 201,568
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 54.7 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 58; Feb. – 62; Mar. – 71; Apr. – 78; May – 85; Jun. – 91; Jul. – 93; Aug. – 92; Sep. – 88; Oct. – 79; Nov. – 69; Dec. – 60
  • Water: Coosa River, Weogufka Creek, Walnut Creek
  • Adjacent Public Land: Leisure Isle, Gunter Hill Park, Sugar Ridge Campground, Wind Creek State Park, Deer Run Park
  • Zip Codes: 36104, 36105, 36106, 36107, 36108, 36109, 36110, 36111, 36112, 36113, 36114, 36115, 36116, 36117, 36119
  • Other Highlights: Montgomery is home to one of the largest recreation centers in Alabama, as well as Blounts Cultural Park, Montgomery Zoo, Capital City Kiwanis Kids' Annual Fishing Day, Hank Williams Museum, Martin Luther King Jr. House and the Civil Rights Memorial.
Tuscaloosa, AL
  • Population: 81,358
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 52.5 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 53, Feb. – 59, Mar. – 66, Apr. – 74, May – 81, Jun. – 88, Jul. – 91, Aug. – 90, Sep. – 86, Oct. – 76, Nov. – 65, Dec. – 56
  • Water: Binion Creek, Blue Creek, Daniel Creek, Deerlick Creek, Black Warrior
  • Adjacent Public Land: Alberta Community Park, Audobon Place, Munny Sokol Park
  • Zip Codes: 35401, 35403, 35404, 35405, 35406
  • Other Highlights: Tuscaloosa is located along the banks of the Black Warrior River and is only one day older than the actual state of Alabama. It is also home to Munny Sokol Park, which is popular with baseball enthusiasts due to its quality game space and field care.
Wetumpka, AL
  • Population: 5,726
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 55 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 57, Feb. – 62, Mar. – 70, Apr. – 77, May – 84, Jun. – 91, Jul. – 93, Aug. – 92, Sep. – 88, Oct. – 79, Nov. – 69, Dec. – 49
  • Water: Coosa River, Tallapoosa River
  • Adjacent Public Land: Fort Toulouse, Jackson Park
  • Zip Codes: 36092, 36093, 36096, 36100, 36106
  • Other Highlights: Wetumpka boasts a 39-site campground overlooking the Coosa River and is located in the scenic foothills of Appalachian Mountains, minutes from the state capital, home to the Coosa River Challenge and Frontier Days.
Winston County, AL
  • Population: 24,843
  • Average Annual Rainfall: 56 inches
  • Average Monthly High Temperatures: Jan. – 44, Feb. – 56, Mar. – 71, Apr. – 74, May – 83, Jun. – 89, Jul. – 91, Aug. – 90, Sep. – 86, Oct. – 75, Nov. – 66, Dec. – 52
  • Water: Smith Lake, Sportsman Lake
  • Adjacent Public Land: Bankhead National Forest, Brushy Creek Recreational Area
  • Zip Codes: 35552, 35553, 35556, 35557, 35558
  • Other Highlights: Founded in honor of John Hancock
Potential Location Source List:
Alternative Energy Organizations & Companies in Alabama
Alabama Animal & Wildlife Groups
Alabama Business Organizations & Resources
Alabama Education Organizations & Resources
Alabama Environmental Groups
Alabama State Government
Alabama International Groups
Conclusion

There is great potential for Bicycle City, Alabama, due to this state's dynamic geography and wide open spaces, as well as its favorable business climate. Alabama is a state that truly cherishes the old south feel and isn't in a hurry to see it fade away. Bicycle City, Ala., could be an ideal destination for families seeking a place to live or visit that is not necessarily eager to conform to the country's fast-paced standards. This great state still realizes the importance of health and fitness, which the prospective Alabama Bicycle City will help to further promote.

What about you?
  • Do you feel Bicycle City, Alabama, would be an ideal community for you, your family and friends to live and work?
  • Which locations in Alabama are the best ones for a new Bicycle City development?
  • What benefits to the community do you envision with a Bicycle City, Ala.?
  • What are your most important priorities in deciding where you want to live and work?
  • What are some things about your town that you’d change if you could?
  • What suggestions do you have for improving the concept of a Bicycle City, AL?
  • Are there any other suggestions you might have for the developers of a project like this?